Apps for Artists

Apps for Artists

Apps for Artists is a conceptual iPad application created for a fine art student, who is interested in working with children, Camila Richardson. It’s a playful, exploratory app designed with Camila’s artwork and is targeted towards engaging young children. Using one of her interactive sculptures, the aim is for the user to play and discover what each section of the sculpture uncovers.

During my second year I undertook a project, ‘Apps for Artists’. The brief for the Apps for Artists module was to develop a mobile app to act as an exhibition of a third year fine art student’s work, based on insights generated from user research. My team, consisting of KatyaEmma and Scott was assigned a student named Camila Richardson who was very interested in creating bold, interactive pieces for young children. To gain insights myself and my team of three conducted and filmed an interview within Camila’s studio space, giving us a feel for her environment and allowing us to observe and photograph her work.

The team then broke apart and individually, each created a short paper prototyping video based on the D&AD digital design brief; to create a multi-screen experience that enhances the users personal or professional life. My video explored using physical off screen gestures with Camila’s work to control what happened within an application. These provided us with various ideas to inspire and inform our design, coming back together as a team to work on the app creating sketches and wireframes.

Using one of her interactive sculptures as the basis, the aim is for the user to play around with each section to see what happens. In her work she wants the child to learn from the experience so we wanted to reflect that in our app. As I was the most technically proficient in coding, I took on the building of the app in xcode as well as working alongside Katya to create the visuals. We created a door that opened, a wheel that span, a slider that moved across and a few areas that produced sound effects. These interactions mimicked those in the real sculpture. You can read more about design decisions and the process of creating the app in my blog, and I’ve posted a screen recording of the app below.